# Friday, July 30, 2010

The Microsoft Developer User Research team regularly does surveys of developers to provide feedback on processes, tools, initiatives etc. At the moment they are looking for Agile project managers and practitioners. Give your opinion! You can sign up to take a survey here.

posted on Friday, July 30, 2010 3:17:58 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Thursday, July 29, 2010

I was lucky enough to get my hands on an advanced copy of Kristin Arnold’s book Boring to Bravo and I highly recommend it. This is a book about being a better presenter. It stands out because it is the first book that I have seen that acknowledges the generational change of the audiences and what the consequences of those changes are (like embrace folks twittering in your meeting rather that have them switch off their cell phones.)

I have been a public speaker for 15 years, a professional one for over 13, and found this book very useful. I learned several things while reading it, including many things I am doing wrong! Based on the advice in the book, I am going to use some of the techniques at my two talks at VSLive in Redmond next week.

The book is a fun read with lots of checklists, sidebars, illustrations, and to do lists. Kristin even quizzes you at the end of each chapter, often using the techniques she demonstrated in the chapter, a brilliant way to reinforce the points! She stresses energy and engagement with the audience and also makes you think of the small things (the side of the stage you walk in on, passive v active voice, using inclusive language, etc) and how they effect the mindset of the audience. If you want to be a more engaging, dynamic speaker, read this book!

image

posted on Thursday, July 29, 2010 5:46:15 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [1] Trackback
# Wednesday, July 28, 2010

People usually know Telerik for our individual developer productivity tools. With the release of TeamPulse yesterday, Telerik is entering the Agile ALM space and delivers team productivity tools to the market.

The idea for TeamPulse was hatched a long time ago at Telerik. It started when we realized that we had a lot of agile teams that compete in a very dynamic marketplace. Our teams at Telerik are agile, high performing, and need to rapidly react to new conditions. (I remember when we were building our Silverlight controls, each CTP/beta of Silverlight v 2.0 broke our code so deeply that we had to start over at each beta!)

As we acquired companies and added more product lines and divisions, we needed a better way to manage the projects, requirements, teams, resources, and iterations. Simply put, with close to 200 developers and many products in several categories, we needed an agile application lifecycle management (ALM) solution. We decided to build some tools with our partner Imaginet for internal use. We liked them so much, we decided to release them to the world about a year ago as the Work Item Manager and Project DashBoard. That is when we decided to build and bring TeamPulse to the world.

We wanted to bring a unique product to the market, a product for teams that lived up to the Telerik values of productivity and simplicity. A product that made it easy for agile teams to manage themselves. At its core, TeamPulse is an agile project management tool that focuses on collaboration. The core features of TeamPulse v1.0 are:

As I have written on this blog before, a true high performing team has to be both “high bandwidth” and transparent. TeamPulse helps the teams get there with its stress on ease of use, collaboration, and tracking/analytics. In addition, TeamPulse will help you be “more agile” and give you advice with the unique to the industry Best Practice Analyzer (BPA). The BPA is an engine that will examine your project data and help your team conform to certain agile characteristics. The cool thing is that you can bypass all of the rules that we ship and write and enforce your own!

image

We are very excited to bring you TeamPulse. I hope you find it as useful as our development teams do.

PS. TeamPulse is written in Microsoft Silverlight 4.0, so you can run it in any environment and out of browser. All you need is a Microsoft backend to host the product, your clients can be Windows or a Mac.

posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2010 6:25:33 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [2] Trackback
# Tuesday, July 27, 2010

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1998 was amended yesterday when the US Copyright office released new rules and exceptions. This is the biggest legal tech news in several years, possibly the biggest news since the DMCA’s passage. The new rules are pretty substantial, they have the potential to change the web and many business models.

The ruling yesterday states six classes of new rules and exceptions. I list them in order of importance (to me):

  1. It is ok to unlock your cell phone (i.e. buy a locked iPhone and unlock it to use it in Europe or a different network like T-Mobile)
  2. It is ok to run any legal software you want on your phone (i.e., it is now legal to have alternatives to the AppStore)
  3. It is ok to crack a DVD’s encryption for fair use purposes in education or criticism
  4. It is ok for an eBook (Kindle) to provide text to speech, even if the book has controls to prevent the text to speech
  5. It is ok to crack a video game’s DRM for legitimate security testing
  6. It is ok to crack computer programs protected by dongles if the dongles is obsolete or are no longer being manufactured

It is now legal in the United States to unlock your cell phone! I never thought I would see the day. Make no mistake, this is Row v Wade for the wireless industry. I have been blogging that the US carriers should do this for a long time. I thought that Google could save us; Google tried with the Nexus One to change the way we buy phones but failed. What Google started, the US Copyright Office continued: this is the first step from decoupling the phone from the carrier, allowing innovation to prevail. Overnight nothing will change, however, in a few years buying a phone in the US may be like buying a phone in Hong Kong: go the electronics store and pick out a super cool phone, then put your chip in it.

The second item is a direct swipe at Apple. Remember last year when Apple blocked Google Voice in the AppStore? Now it is legal for you to bypass the AppStore and download to your iPhone Google Voice via Google.com. Take that Steve Jobs. That said, an era of openness on the iPhone is not upon us. Pundits expect Apple to play cat and mouse with its OS updates. I suspect that they will use the OS to cripple unapproved apps, and possibly get sued for it under the DMCA as well as anti-trust. This new ruling will favor Android, Blackberry, and Windows Phone over Apple unless Apple opens up.

The third item opens the door for mash-ups, you know those short videos of a famous movie with a new soundtrack that is totally funny. YouTube will now take a deep exhale. The fourth item is a swipe against the publishers who are holding Amazon and Apple hostage. The last two make sense and finally legalize something that was rational and done pretty widely anyway.

The web and wireless as well as well as eReader industries are about to change, potentially drastically. Today, copyright law just stepped foot into the 21st century. There is still a long way to go, but this is a great first step.

posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2010 6:42:20 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [1] Trackback
# Monday, July 26, 2010

Next week, I will be speaking at VS Live! at Microsoft’s campus in Redmond, Washington. I will be doing two talks.

Wednesday, on the data track, I will be following Chris Selles’ Entity Framework and OData and Database Projects and Jon Flanders’ Building RESTful Services Using Windows Communication Foundation talks with my own: Building RESTful Applications with the Open Data Protocol, so I will skip the “What is REST” slides up front and just start coding. ;)

On Thursday, they lumped my “The Daily Scrum” talk on the Visual Studio and .NET track. While the title is The Daily Scrum, I will give some Scrum overviews and then open the floor to Q&A. All levels of participants will benefit from the talk. There will be zero discussion on Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4.0. Actually, there will be no code at all.

In addition, I will be addressing the recent rift in the agile universe between the “pure” Scrum folks and the “Scrum, butters” which Ken Schwaber labels me. At the end of the talk, I will also address the rise of Kanban, an alternative agile methodology originating at Toyota in Japan. Kanban is quite popular here in Hong Kong where I live and I have seen it work at some very large global organizations as well as startups. Living in Asia over the last year has changed my perspective on agile and Kanban: I have seen how this Japanese invention works and can compliment a flexible agile strategy. I’ll weave this experience to my presentation. You won’t want to miss out.

image

posted on Monday, July 26, 2010 9:53:51 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Friday, July 23, 2010

In just over a week, I will be speaking at VS Live! at Microsoft’s campus in Redmond, Washington. In addition to my Scrum and OData talks, I will be helping host Devopalooza on Wednesday August 4th at 6:30-8:30pm in Building 33. We have a lot of cool stuff ready for the attendees, including a “Developer Jeopardy” contest. Brian Peek and I will be the hosts of the game show and we have been working hard coming up with good questions.

Yes, there will be prizes. Yes there will be lots of wise cracks. And yes I will be wearing my rugby jersey.

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posted on Friday, July 23, 2010 5:04:06 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Friday, July 16, 2010

Yesterday Telerik released the Q2 version of OpenAccess ORM as well as the rest of the product line. Yesterday (Part I) I showed you the menus, Data Service Wizard, and new XAML templates. Today I will show you round tripping. Next week I will talk about RIA Services and model first.

OpenAccess Q2’s new LINQ implementation and Visual Designer introduces database round tripping.  Now you can make changes in your model and persist them to your database table. (You always had the ability to make a database schema change and refresh your model.) Let’s see this feature in action. The Model Schema Explorer gives you a view of your mapped entities. If you right click on a table you can choose Edit Table from the context menu to begin editing your entity.

image

This brings up the Edit Table.. dialog where you can insert, edit, and delete columns and set metadata such as data types and nullable.

image

I’ll go ahead add a CurrentCustomer column as a bit to indicate if the customer is current or not. That is all there is to it, so I will right click on my model and select Update Database From Model as shown here.

image

This brings up the Schema Update Wizard. This wizard will allow you to execute the script right away or generate it and save it for later. It will also give you the choice between making an update (alter table) compared to a create (create table).  I’ll decide to make an update and execute it now and click next.

image

After I tell the wizard what table to update the database with (and make sure you have mapped your new column to the model and recompiled the project before running the wizard), you are presented with the script and given the ability to save the script, execute it, or copy it to the clipboard.

image

Being a database geek, I am only going to copy to the clipboard the part of the code that I need, the ALTER TABLE command with the ADD column and run that against my SQL Server. I could let OpenAccess run the code for me, but as I said, I am a database geek and like complete control. The tool gives you whatever level of control you desire. Once you run the TSQL either via the wizard or by hand, the process is complete.

Enjoy!

posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 4:00:15 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Thursday, July 15, 2010

Today Telerik released the Q2 version of OpenAccess ORM as well as the rest of the product line. I’ll take you on a short tour of some of the new ORM features. Today I will show you the menus, Data Service Wizard, and new XAML templates. Tomorrow (Part II) I will show you round tripping and model first.

The new LINQ Implementation and Visual Designer that we introduced in Q1 has taken over. The first thing that you will realize is that the new LINQ domain model is the default way to interact with OpenAccess as shown by the menu below. (Don’t worry if you still interact with the older OpenAccess classes you can get back to that menu via the Options menu.)

image

With this release the Data Service Wizard is now a part of the product, avoiding a separate download. We have enhanced the wizard to not only create a service for you, but to create a new Silverlight client to consume the service and its basic CRUD operations. The wizard will also provide automatic themeing: if you are using the Telerik Q2 Silverlight Controls you will get a whole bunch of themes installed and the wizard will create a Silverlight application along with the Telerik controls and a brand new XAML template. (This feature is only available if you have Telerik Silverlight controls installed.)

image 

The templates are way nicer than anything I can come up with on my own. ;)

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Look for some new features in the Data Service Wizard in the next service pack to include support for VB and more visual representations of one to many relationships.

Enjoy!

posted on Thursday, July 15, 2010 6:29:16 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Wednesday, July 14, 2010

The iPhone 4.0 has been marred with controversy even before it shipped. Before it was announced and launched, tech bloggers got a hold of an iPhone 4 and posted blogs about it, causing Apple to crack down on the bloggers and their sources. Almost immediately after launch, a hardware defect was discovered that when reception is poor, holding the phone a certain way caused the phone to drop the call. Apple’s response: Hold the phone differently or buy a $30 case for the phone.

Almost four weeks and 2 million units sold later, the party line from Apple is the same, hold the phone differently or buy a case. Blogosphere as well as the main stream media have not let this issue go and now it is even made it into everyday conversation between normal people (meaning not geeks like us.) Consumer reports yesterday did not recommend the iPhone 4.0 due to the antenna issue. That is pretty huge. Apple’s response: deleting all threads on its forums about the Consumer Reports recommendation.

PR experts are saying that total recall is inevitable, while tech bloggers say no. I don’t know what Apple will do, however, if I was on the board of directors, I would recommend a full and complete recall. Put Steve Jobs on TV to say sorry and give everyone a brand new phone. Here is why: Apple fanboys don’t read Consumer Reports, but my mom does.

While there are a large number of Apple fanboys out there that will follow Steve Jobs anywhere he leads them, that group is a fixed size (apparently about 2 million.) They will preorder the iPhone and its $30 case and probably leave nasty comments on this blog without even reading the whole thing. Fine. All successful companies and products have their fanboys. The problem is in order for Apple to grow and take on more market share, they need to go mainstream, win over the non smart phone customers. You think Apple is profitable now, wait until they start to convert the non smart phone customers into iPhone customers. Regular phone users outnumber smart phone users in the US by about 4-1, in the emerging markets, it is even higher. The opportunity is enormous.

Apple and the iPhone can do this, but to do so, they have to have one clear message: Apple products are elegant and easier to use above anything else. If this message is delivered successfully, Apple’s brand will command a premium. This is why Apple has made billions selling iPods, iPads, and iPhones. My mom has an iPod, enough said.

However, mom is using a four year old cheapie Nokia phone and is considering a new smart phone. She reads consumer reports and has been for 20 years. She watches the news. She doesn’t understand the difference between the “bars” problem and “antenna” and why a $30 case will help her. All she hears is Apple=problem. She will walk into the store and say to the salesperson “show me something that is like the iPhone but does not have the problem I hear about on the news.” They will show her a slick new Droid X.

Steve Jobs has to make the decision fast since he is losing control of the message, something rare in Apple-land. Recent history has shown us how a slow to recall company, Toyota, became tarnished very quickly. Just a year ago Toyota was on top of the car world, the #1 brand in the US market. Today they number 3! 

Now consider the famous Tylenol case. On September 29th, 1982, a 12 year old died from taking a cyanide laced Tylenol tablet. A few others died a day later and the FBI figured out that someone had poisoned bottles of Tylenol in a Chicago neighborhood. What did Johnson & Johnson, the maker of Tylenol do? They immediately distributed warnings to hospitals and distributors and halted Tylenol production and advertising. Even though the poison bottles were only discovered in a single Chicago neighborhood, a few days later J&J recalled every Tylenol bottle on the market, over 31 million of them, worth over $100 million. J&J then did a public awareness campaign and reissued new bottles with tamper proof bottles. When the new product went to sale, market share dropped from over 35% to 8%. Within a year, the public had rewarded J&J for its decisive action and Tylenol regained its market share and went on to be the #1 product in its category. People still don’t forget, 28 years later, it is still required reading at any MBA class.

While the iPhone’s antenna problem is not life threatening as in the Toyota and Tylenol cases, the damage to Apple’s brand can be catastrophic. With Google’s Android right on its tail, putting Steve Jobs on TV will do wonders for the Apple brand and PR. Steve will go from a saint to a god, silencing his critics overnight. I might even become a fanboy. ;)

posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 1:58:45 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Thursday, July 15, 2010
Distributed .NET in Action: End-to-End Application Architecture Illustrated

Subject: 
You must register at https://www.clicktoattend.com/invitation.aspx?code=147966 in order to be admitted to the building and attend.
C’mon, admit it: you are a bit overwhelmed - by all these technologies, approaches, patterns, do's and dont's? In this session Christian Weyer will show you a realistic (though not real) services-based distributed .NET application leveraging technologies like .NET Fx, WCF, WF, WIF, data access, different UI stacks including recent mobile platforms) and more. Come and see techniques like data mapping, duplex communication, large data transfer, caching or claims-based security. All applied in a reasonable manner, in an end-to-end fashion. Be prepared for a slightly different user group session.

Speaker: 
Christian Weyer is co-founder of thinktecture, a company providing in-depth technical consulting and training services for software architects and developers. Christian has been focusing on the ideas and concepts of service-orientation and their practical translation in customer projects in the past years, with Windows Communication Foundation (WCF), Windows Workflow Foundation (WF) and Cloud Computing being the main areas and technologies applied recently. He tries to focus on the end-to-end aspects of distributed application architecture, design and implementation. This obviously includes mobile client technologies like the iPhone and Windows Phone platforms.
The national and international developer and architect community knows Christian from his weblog, webcasts, forums activities, user group talks and conference performances. He was selected as one of the Microsoft MVPs for Connected Systems and is an independent Microsoft Regional Director for Germany. Get in touch with him at christian.weyer@thinktecture.com
http://weblogs.thinktecture.com/cweyer/
http://www.thinktecture.com/

Date: 
Thursday, July 15, 2010

Time: 
Reception 6:00 PM , Program 6:30 PM

Location:  
Microsoft , 1290 Avenue of the Americas (the AXA building - bet. 51st/52nd Sts.) , 6th floor

Directions:
B/D/F/V to 47th-50th Sts./Rockefeller Ctr
1 to 50th St./Bway
N/R/W to 49th St./7th Ave.

posted on Tuesday, July 13, 2010 2:52:23 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Monday, July 12, 2010

Want to learn about TFS 2010 by doing nine application lifecycle (ALM) labs? You can download a Virtual Machine from Microsoft that has a full version of Windows and Visual Studio 2010 Team Foundation Server including nine labs. You can download it as Hyber-V, Windows 7 VPC or regular “old school” VPC. The VPC will not expire until Dec 31, 2010, but Microsoft promises to release another one before then.

Check out this  blog for more details.

posted on Monday, July 12, 2010 10:19:57 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Friday, July 09, 2010

I reported the other day in my blog that Android overtook Apple’s market share of smart phones in the US in Q1 2010. I got my data from the NPD Group. You can read the report here, it states that in the first quarter 2010 (Jan, Feb, and March) RIM was at 36%, Android 28%, and iPhone 21%.

I have some new, and somewhat conflicting data. Yesterday comScore reported Android in 4th place, not second place. comScore’s data covers a three month moving average, ending in May 2010, so comScore and NDP are not completely comparing apples to apples. comScore states that Android is the only platform to gain from the last report, a gain of 4%. This data is before the release of the iPhone 4 and Droid X, so for a better comparison, we should revisit these figures in a few months.

Here is the data from their press release:

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posted on Friday, July 09, 2010 7:43:52 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [1] Trackback
# Thursday, July 08, 2010

Tuesday Microsoft released WebMatrix.  WebMatrix and its supporting technologies (IIS Express, SQL CE and the new ASP.NET “Razor”) is a new free tool from Microsoft for web development.  It is a lightweight IDE (not Visual Studio) that provides coding and database support. You can use WebMatrix to select from an open source web application gallery (WordPress, CRM, e-Commerce platforms, etc) to start your application template from. Lastly, WebMatrix makes it easy to publish web sites to web hosting providers (or even help you find one if you don’t have one).

Microsoft is not targeting me, or most of you (professional developers) with this new product. Clearly Microsoft is targeting the students, hackers, hobbyists, and Facebook application developers. The issue is that today most of these developers are using the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PhP) stack. WebMatrix is an attempt to lower that price barrier (all of WebMatrix is free) and level the playing field. The question is will it work?

Ten years or so ago, I would say no, this would not work, Microsoft was the bad guy. Today the perception has changed and Microsoft is perceived as “big corporate” but not the bad guy. Developers look for cost and innovation when deciding what platform to use. LAMP has a huge head start, but Razor makes coding .NET for WebMatrix pretty easy and the template engine allows you to base your application off another’s API, a huge head start when building something custom.

Will Microsoft succeed in winning over mindshare from the LAMP stack? I don’t know, but now they have a fighting chance.

posted on Thursday, July 08, 2010 11:27:45 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [2] Trackback
# Wednesday, July 07, 2010

Companies that had market dominance always had a golden era: a time when everything went right, market share did nothing but grow, its stock soared, and the company had nothing but awesome coverage in the media. The first half of the last decade belonged to Google and the second half obviously belonged to Apple. That said, Apple’s golden era is now over.

While Apple is still strong and selling well, it is no longer the darling of the media. In the past it was taboo to knock on Apple in the media. Now that line has been crossed and there is no going back.  Microsoft lost the media in the late 90s with the IE fight and anti-trust battle, Google lost its halo with its on again, off again do no evil in China policy over the past few years. This year Apple seems to have stumbled with the kicking down the doors of a journalist’s source demanding the lost iPhone back.  Someone should remind Steve Jobs that an attack on one journalist is an attack on them all and that some journalists went to jail to protect a source just a few years ago under a Bush administration crackdown. If journalists are willing to stand up to the full force of the US Federal Government, they will stand up to Steve Jobs.

This led to bad blood with the media and the media jumped on the iPhone 4.0 antenna problem with glee. Business week even mocked Steve Jobs’ claim that the iPhone 4 was the most successful product launch in Apple’s history. Remember Jon Stewart’s AppHoles? The rock star treatment of Apple in the media is over.   That will make Apple spend more time and energy on its image. (Something it is good at, BTW.)

The media is not the only reason why Apple’s golden era is over. The second reason is the government. Last summer’s blocking of Google Voice by the AppStore led to the first threat of FCC and DOJ investigations. Now there are grumblings in Washington DC about more investigations (which I don’t think are necessary, but obviously the government has less important things to do.) Once DC opens up a case, expect the EU to follow suit. Government investigations and suits distract companies and they never fully recover. Just ask IBM and Microsoft. Apple will not only be distracted by these potential governmental probes, but will also have to devote more resources to its legal and government affairs issues, resources that should be going to products.

The third reason why the golden ear is over is increased competition and the “second mover advantage”. Apple was the first mover in the uber cool app driven web integrated smart phone category: they created a new category and reaped the rewards for years in both market share and mindshare. As with all first movers, Apple spent a lot of time and money educating the consumer base, telling them that they want this new product category. As what always happens with a new category, second movers then come in and free ride on that education and offer similar and sometimes superior products. The second movers get the second mover advantage and start to eat away at the first mover’s margins and market share. This is what is happening with Google’s Android. Android is growing faster than the iPhone and overtook the iPhone’s market share in the United States for smart phones in the first quarter of this year. A year ago Android was a rounding error, now it is a dominate player and formidable competitor to Apple. Second mover advantage at work.

I also won’t count out Microsoft. While I am not confident that they can create a better offering than the iPhone or Android out of the gate, they are masters at the second mover advantage game. (Remember how the Mac created the PC revolution, Netscape created the Internet revolution, etc.) Microsoft is flush with cash coming off its 150 million Windows 7 sales this year and motivated. Apple will face massive competition in the form of two tech industry giants: Google and Microsoft. In addition you can’t expect Samsung’s Galaxy, RIM/Blackberry and Nokia to roll over and die either. So five giants on Apple’s heels, as well as any startups that emerge.

Don’t get me wrong, Apple will still be strong and successful. The golden age is just over. Welcome to the rest of us Apple.

posted on Wednesday, July 07, 2010 8:02:43 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [3] Trackback
# Tuesday, July 06, 2010

I recently read Essential C# 4.0 by Mark Michaelis and highly recommend it.

This is a book about the fundamentals and advanced features of the C# language. Mark does a great job laying out the concepts in a clear and concise way, with great examples and engaging prose. If you are new to C# you should make this the first book you read and read it cover to cover. If you are an advanced programmer, or even an old timer like me who has been using C# for 10 years since the beta, reading it will make you a better programmer.

The book is not just a rehash of the user manuals and new features of C# 4.0, rather is it a well thought out guide to using the language. That said, I learned much more about the new features of C# 4.0 here than anywhere else. By reading this book I now understand the underlying structure of dynamic typing and parallel programming much better. I highly recommend it to both beginner and experienced developers.

posted on Tuesday, July 06, 2010 6:44:00 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Friday, July 02, 2010

I am not the number one fan of patent law, I tend to think that most of the law is outdated and needs review for the 21st century, but I do think that patents play a key role in fostering innovation. Without patents, we will have less innovation.

It gave me great pleasure to see the US Supreme Court rule against expanding patent law to so called “business method claims.” In the case, Bilski v. Kappos, Bilski tried to patent a “business process.” He did not invent anything, just a creative way to hedge commodities. Luckily for us, the court’s finding this week was that Bilski’s patent was not valid.

Some will say that the court has to “get with the 21st century” and in some issues that criticism is correct, however, in Bilski v. Kappos, the court made the right decision. For example I could go and patent my implementation of Scrum since it is a business process and then turn around an sue all of you since I think you are using it. Clearly, we did not need this.

Score one for the legal system protecting innovation.

posted on Friday, July 02, 2010 11:58:02 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Thursday, July 01, 2010

With the Q1 release of Telerik OpenAccess ORM, Telerik released a brand new LINQ Implementation and supporting Visual Entity Designer. I have shown in this blog how to connect to SQL Server, MySQL, and how to use the new LINQ with RIA Services. Today I will show you how to connect to SQL Azrue.

To get started, we have to create a new Telerik Domain Model in the server (ASP.NET) project. We’ll create a new Domain Model by right clicking on the server project and selecting “Add” and choosing the Telerik Domain Model from the menu.

In the dialog presented by OpenAccess select the database you want to connect to, for this project choose Microsoft SQL Azure. You also have to manually put in the connection string to SQL Azure in the format of:

Server=tcp:yourSQLAzureDatabaseServer;Database=YourDatabaseName;USER=YourUserID, Password=YourPassword;

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Next you have to map your tables to entities. The easiest thing to do is just map all of your tables by selecting the checkbox next to “Tables” in the Choose Database Items dialog and pressing the Finish button.

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Visual Studio adds a new Telerik Domain Model to your project.

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Now you are free to use the LINQ implementation to build your application. For simplicity, I will drag a gridView control onto the form and then use LINQ to bind all the customers in Germany. The code is here:

 

   1:  protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
   2:  {
   3:      if (IsPostBack==false)
   4:      {
   5:       //data context
   6:       NorthwindEntityDiagrams dat = new NorthwindEntityDiagrams();
   7:       //LINQ Statement
   8:       var result = from c in dat.Customers
   9:                           where c.Country == "Germany"
  10:                           orderby c.CustomerID
  11:                           select c;
  12:      //Databind to the ASP.NET GridView
  13:      GridView1.DataSource = result;
  14:      GridView1.DataBind();
  15:      }
  16:  }
  17:   

The results are show here.

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Enjoy!

posted on Thursday, July 01, 2010 2:50:27 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback