# Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Thursday, November 19, 2009
Parallel Programming and Patterns using Microsoft .NET 4.0 ( Task , PLINQ , Data)

Subject: 
You must register at https://www.clicktoattend.com/invitation.aspx?code=141114 in order to be admitted to the building and attend.
The manycore shift presents an unprecedented business opportunity for developers to design new software experiences that take advantage of the performance power of manycore architectures. At the same time, parallel programming is complex, difficult and labor-intensive, for even the most skilled developers.
This session will cover some basic concepts of Parallel Programming , related patterns , demos and .NET 4.0 support for parallel programming.

Speaker: 
Navneet Srivastava, Emerging Health Information Technology

Navneet is lead architect and manager of engineers in the Product Development division of Emerging Health Information Technology, a subsidiary of Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. He oversees design and development of the breakthrough clinical intelligence application, Clinical Looking Glass, employing cutting edge Microsoft technologies and a host of best practices. In past positions, Navneet has developed other healthcare applications with national distribution.

Date: 
Thursday, November 19, 2009

Time: 
Reception 6:00 PM , Program 6:15 PM

Location:  
Apress , 233 Spring Street (between 6th Avenue and Varick Street) New York, NY 10013 , 6th Floor

Directions:
C or E trains to Spring Street or #1 train to Houston Street

posted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 10:04:52 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Monday, November 16, 2009

Joel and I are doing a BOF session on Tuesday about Agile tools and Teams. (I am not listed on the PDC web site for some reason, but I will be there alongside Joel.)

We will most definitely show the Telerik Dashboard and Work Item Manager as well as chat about tons of other great tools. Most importantly, we want to hear from you at this session. We did it that way at TechEd in LA earlier this year (the #1 ranked interactive session at TechEd 2009) and it worked well. Hope to see you there and have a great discussion.

Tooling on Agile Teams

Joel Semeniuk in 309 on Tuesday at 3:00 PM

Agile practices focus on customer value and team interactions. There is significantly growing and important set of tools that work to help Agile teams be more “agile”. In this session, we would like to hear what you have to say about tools for Agile teams? What tools work? What tools don’t work? What tools are missing in the industry? What tools can you not live without? Come join the discussion or simply listen to what your peers have to say.

See you there!

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posted on Monday, November 16, 2009 1:54:14 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Sunday, November 15, 2009

Following the lead of the Department of Justice (DOJ) in Washington, DC, the Attorney General of the State of New York, Andrew Cuomo, has brought a lawsuit against Intel, calling them a monopolist. While Intel has recently settled legal claims with rival AMD (mostly due to patent disputes as well as some anti-competition charges), Cuomo is suing Intel on the grounds that they are a monopoly and have stifled competition.

While Intel’s market share is huge, over 80% of chips sold are “Intel Inside”, the free market has regulated the industry very nicely and lead to innovation. Intel and its cheap and low powered Atom processor started the netbook revolution (I now see as many netbooks as Macs in Starbucks). Look at the progress with multi-core and x64 architecture. (Actually three years ago I thought AMD’s x64 chips were better since their high end chips had more cores at the time. I remember buying an AMD based 2xquad core x64 SQL Server machine in that time frame and was impressed that AMD’s multicore server chips were so much better.)

Over ten years ago, I lobbied the US Congress against the DOJ’s case against Microsoft on similar grounds. At the time did Microsoft do some bad “evil empire” things that they were able to do since they were so big? Yes. Enough to warrant an anti-trust legal battle? No. The free market was able to sort it out on its own, far better than the legal remedies brought by the DOJ. When Microsoft got all big and lazy with dominate Internet Explorer market share, boom, Firefox came out of nowhere and handed Microsoft its lunch. Now Microsoft is starting to invest and innovate in the browser space, but now has to deal with not only Firefox, but Chrome and Safari. The free market did loads more to spur innovation and regulate Microsoft than the anti-trust trial even dreamed of doing! Same with Intel, allow the free market to decide, not lawyers.

Fellow New Yorker and good friend Andrew Bust wrote an opinion here. Andrew is a registered Democrat and I am a registered Republican. We both agree on this issue. The last time we agreed on a political issue was when DOS was the primary operating system used.

Let the free market regulate the industry and don’t let the government stifle innovation. Sign a petition here.

posted on Sunday, November 15, 2009 4:38:07 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Saturday, November 14, 2009

I appear again on .NET Rocks this week, this time talking with Richard and Carl about life in the 21st century. I talk about marketing in the digital age, geek stuff, and also argue with Carl about Amazon’s decision to remove the book 1984 from the Kindle.

You can listen here. Enjoy.

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posted on Saturday, November 14, 2009 9:08:59 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Friday, November 13, 2009

Earlier this week, Microsoft released SQL Server 2008 R2 November CTP (Microsoft needs to hire some people from Apple to do something about the naming of their products.) I learned while at TechEd Europe 2009 that the version of SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) that ships with R2 CTP3 has support for SQL Azure. So I downloaded the CTP (I had to do it in the speaker room, the speaker hotel blocks just about everything on its “free” wifi) and got rolling.

After installing, I decided to play around with the SQL Azure support. I was able to put my login credentials right into the SQL Server connection dialog and did not need to specify a database in the “Options” menu like I had to do before.

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I was able to play around with SSMS and Azure and create databases tables, views, etc (via TSQL, not dialogs). Most importantly, SSMS does support the Object Explorer for SQL Azure!  We can’t change the database as we can in other community tools, however, this is still a beta and it has come a long way so far. SSMS supports most of the functionality that you will need to get started with SQL Azure.

image

Enjoy!

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posted on Friday, November 13, 2009 5:02:34 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Thursday, November 12, 2009

Just a few weeks ago Microsoft released Visual Studio 2010 Beta2. Last week Telerik put its Q3 release live into production. One of the cool new Q3 features is that OpenAccess now works seamlessly with Visual Studio 2010. That means you can target .NET 3.5 or .NET 4.0 using either Visual Studio 2008 (.NET 3.5) or Visual Studio 2010 (.NET 4.0).

I will do a quick demo with Visual Studio 2010, SQL Azure, and OpenAccess. With OpenAccess Q3 installed, I fired up Visual Studio 2010 and started a console project targeting .NET 4.0

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While the project will target the .NET 4.0 Framework, we have to do one small thing to make it work. By default the project type is “.NET 4.0 Client Profile” so we have to change that to a straight up .NET 4.0 project type. The way to do this is to right click on the project and select properties. In the properties dialog Application section, you will see Target framework;  select .NET 4.0 and you are good to go. (Visual Studio will have to close and reopen the project for you.)

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Next we have to fire up OpenAccess via the Enable Project Wizard. When I start the Enable Project to use ORM Wizard, OpenAccess asked me what database to use, and as I showed before on this blog, Q3 now supports SQL Azure natively. Notice that the wizard will prompt you to put in your SQL Azure credentials and will give you the basic template for your server name: tcp:<sqlazureid>.database.windows.net.

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Note: Depending on your setup in Visual Studio 2010, you may have to use the Server name without the tcp: and use the syntax UserName@sqlazureid. Visual Studio 2010 will give you an error in your setup if the default does not work. If you get this error you would enter the following for your SQL Azure credentials:

Server Name: sqlazureid.database.net (no tcp:, so for example p28drog84.database.net)
User Name: YourSQLAzureUserID@sqlazureid (for example: Stevef@p28drog84)

Next you will want to map some SQL Azure tables to OpenAccess entities. This can be done pretty easily, just by running the Reverse Mapping wizard. Here you can select your tables to map. By default OpenAccess will also now map the foreign keys of each entity as a primitive type in addition to the complex type. This will help a great amount if you are using your entities in conjunction with any data service such as WCF or ADO .NET Data Services. (More on that later.)

image

Once you have mapped your entities, you are free to work with them. You can use the OpenAccess LINQ implementation (which has went through a major overhaul and is in line with the LINQ to SQL and LINQ to Entities LINQ implementations.) As I showed last time, you can write a simple LINQ statement to filter all the Customers by a certain country as shown here:

   1:  static void Main(string[] args)
   2:  {
   3:      IObjectScope dat = ObjectScopeProvider1.GetNewObjectScope();
   4:      //LINQ Statement   
   5:      var result = from c in dat.Extent<Customer>()
   6:                   where c.Country == "Germany"
   7:                   orderby c.CompanyName
   8:                   select c;
   9:      //Print out the company name  
  10:      foreach (var cust in result)
  11:      {
  12:          Console.WriteLine("Company Name: " + cust.CompanyName);
  13:      }
  14:      //keep the console window open  
  15:      Console.Read();
  16:  }

 

image

Enjoy!

posted on Thursday, November 12, 2009 11:20:25 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Wednesday, November 11, 2009

For me at least. After delivering three sessions at TechEd Europe, I have to turn around and head home and then turn around and head out to the PDC (I have an agile birds of a feather session there, more info later.)

It was great speaking and I also helped out at the Telerik booth. During the slow time, the whole team took a break and were brave enough to trust me to manage the booth all by myself. (I did not break anything!)

See you all next year!

posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 8:51:26 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Last summer Telerik released the Oslo Comparison and Migration Tool. It is a tool that is available free for the community. It allows you to compare two Microsoft code named “M” files, see a visual diff, and then merge the results. (M is the code name for a new data modeling language from Microsoft.)

Telerik has expanded the tool to allow comparison of items in the SQL Server “Repository” and then do the same visualdiff and them merge the schema. Developers who have been playing with the M language and repository will find it very useful to have a tool that will allow comparisons and migrations, since the requirements of our applications are always changing! :) Pretty cool.

Just a note: Telerik will be updating the tool as soon as Microsoft makes some “M” and SQL Server “Repository” related announcements next week at PDC. Stay tuned!

posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 1:34:25 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback
# Monday, November 9, 2009

I am in Berlin for TechEd 2009 while Germany is celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Berlin Wall falling. Today most of us take for granted the society we live in, however, when I was growing up Eastern Europe was “the enemy”, all colored red on a map. We were not free to do business with the “eastern block”, nor were we allowed to visit without permission. Today that is all gone and I now work for a company that was behind the “iron curtain”, a company that would never have existed if the Berlin Wall did not fall.

Last night we walked down by the Brandenburg Gate and downtown Berlin. I listened to amazing stories from my colleague at Telerik, Jan Blessenohl. Jan is German and was in university in 1989. On November 9th, he actually traveled to East Berlin to buy some cheap textbooks when the protests overwhelmed the Berlin Wall and when it fell he was right there at the Brandenburg Gate standing on the wall, a part of history.

It is amazing to be here today…

Update 1

The speaker gift at TechEd was a piece of the Berlin Wall!

Update 2 (Photos!)

I went to the Brandenburg Gate area near Potsdamplatz this evening to watch the ceremonies. What was really cool was that there were 1,000 foam dominos lined up to fall, each decorated by 1,000 artists around the world. Because there were 1,000 of them and it was pouring rain, I got to get up close to them and take lots of photos.

IMG_0765

Also a photo of the Brandenburg Gate:

IMG_0768

posted on Monday, November 9, 2009 4:25:15 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0] Trackback