# Wednesday, 24 August 2011

The iPad’s growth is truly amazing. Why is the iPad so dominate after so many failed offerings from the popular Android camp? Why did HP throw in the towel after just a short time? Why does nobody talk about the Blackberry offering? Why will Windows 8 tablets fail to stack up against the iPad? The answer: Nobody wants a tablet!

Go into an electronics store and try to buy an Android tablet. They will ask you a lot of questions to make sure you really want it. Why? They are flooded with returns. The tablet marketing is selling the “whole web” and “tablet computer” with USB ports for keyboards, etc, and folks are thinking that they are buying a laptop replacement.

Tablets are not laptop replacements, they a smartphone replacement. Meaning all the “cool” things we did on the smartphone at home (or hotel room or coffee shop): surf the web, lay in bed and read the newspaper, consume media, light email, watch TV, etc, we do now on a tablet with its superior form factor.

But consumers don’t want a tablet, they want a lightweight, fully branded, integrated “experience” device. Only Apple offers this today, hence the iPad’s market share is so huge and big names are exiting the category. The iPad is basically a big iPhone and that is why it sells so well. The Android tablets are weak and you have to build that experience yourself so it feels disjointed. (Sure it is flexible, but hard to put together yourself.)

My prediction is that all the other tablets, including Windows 8 tablets, are doomed. Except one. One company is so ubiquitous, has such a powerful brand, and has all the pieces in place, that they can build an “experience” device too. That company is Amazon. The tech world is abuzz about the forthcoming Amazon Tablet. Pundits are speculating that an Amazon branded tablet running its popular Kindle software, CloudPlayer MP3 music, streaming video, Android App Store, cloud storage, and e-commerce site’s 200+ million customers, can really challenge Apple. They sure can, as long as Amazon focuses on the tablet “experience” and not the tablet “computer”.